jump to navigation

Till We Have Faces: Chapters 1 & 2 January 2, 2007

Posted by Danielle in Till We Have Faces by C.S. Lewis.
trackback

We are discussing chapters 1 and 2 here. Leave and check out comments below.

What are your first impressions of Orual?

Advertisements

Comments»

1. bethany3boys - January 2, 2007

I am loving this book. It is a fast read. When I read the back cover I thought I wouldn’t like Orual that much, but in these first few chapters she surprised me. I love how motherly she is to Psyche. I love how she isn’t envious of her beauty it just seems to make her love and protect her more. I really like her personality. She seems down to earth yet a little rough around the edges…into learning, smart etc etc. Now I need to slow down a little…I can’t put the book down at night. I love mythical stories like this.

2. Ashleigh - January 2, 2007

I think the opening paragraphs of chapter one reveal a lot about Orual; perhaps not who she is in the beginning of the book, but more so who she’ll become as it unfolds. Orual says:

I am old now and have not much to fear from the anger of the gods. I have no husband nor child, nor hardly a friend, through whom they can hurt me. My body, this lean carrion that still has to be washed and fed and have clothes hung about it daily with so many changes, they may kill as they please. The succession is provided for. My crown passes to my nephew.

Being, for all these reasons, free from fear, I will write in this book what no one who has happiness would dare to write.

In these sentences I felt a sadness for Orual. It appears that whatever happens in the book leaves her alone with no one who loves her. Not only is she left alone, but she’s also left fearless and seemingly bitter.

As far as the reminder of the chapters, I agree with Bethany in that it was wonderful to see Orual’s motherly side come out. I think she was so longing to love and be loved — something not found in her father or Redival — that she saw in this tiny infant the possibility for that. I liked that the rejection she experienced had not robbed her of the ability to love and be loved.

3. Michelle - January 3, 2007

I am struck by two things regarding Orual…

First, how poorly she is treated by all but Fox. Each time someone speaks ill of her, I cringe and find myself wanting to comfort her. No doubt her life is difficult and lonely. I’m grateful for her Grandfathers care for her.

However… she seems unaffected by the harsh life and negative feelings thrown her way. She just goes about life focusing on the positive- her learning, the love she receives from her Grandfather, Istra. I think that is an admirable quality and makes me like her all the more.

4. Danielle - January 3, 2007

I too, wasn’t sure if I’d like Orual. But soon in the book I came to feel sorry for her and to dislike how she’s treated by her family. However, I admired that she sought to instead become well-learned instead of worry about being beautiful. I too, admired how she decided to become a surrogate mother to Istra.

5. heather - January 4, 2007

Orual begins her story stating that she no longer has anything to fear from the gods, but it becomes quite evident that she didn’t always hold that sentiment. As a child she is obviously disturbed by the idea of offending Ungit. It will be interesting to find out what happened to her fear and what caused her to accuse the gods.

I like Orual. She doesn’t wallow in self-pity because of her ugliness; she finds a positive outlet in her studies and her mothering of Istra. I also admire her because she isn’t intimidated by Istra’s beauty. I think it would be an accurate assumption that even “average” looking women are intimidated by the very beautiful, yet Orual is not. Instead of avoiding being in the company of beauty, she is drawn to Istra and finds in her the “source of all my joys.” (p.20)

I also admire her fierce loyalty and allegiance to those she loves, as evidenced by her concern for Fox when the King threatens to send him to the mines.

6. Nicole - January 18, 2007

I think her love of knowledge and obvious intelligence is really what I like about her at first glance. Of course her love for her sister as well, but it seems that she, unlike many of us females, seems to look at the world through logical eyes and not emotional ones in contrast to her sister. This is not to say she does not have emotions as evidenced by her affection for here sister and the Fox, however it is her intelligence that seems to guide her.

7. Nicole - January 18, 2007

I think her love of knowledge and obvious intelligence is really what I like about her at first glance. Of course her love for her sister as well, but it seems that she, unlike many of us females, seems to look at the world through logical eyes and not emotional ones in contrast to her sister. This is not to say she does not have emotions as evidenced by her affection for here sister and the Fox, however it is her intelligence that seems to guide her.

8. Ashleigh - January 19, 2007

Nicole, I love your observation here that Orual “unlike many of us females, seems to look at the world through logical eyes and not emotional ones.” I hadn’t thought about that, but you’re so right.


Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: